Class fashion – Replica Christian Louboutin Store http://replicachristianlouboutinstore.com/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 11:34:29 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://replicachristianlouboutinstore.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-39.png Class fashion – Replica Christian Louboutin Store http://replicachristianlouboutinstore.com/ 32 32 How Lacie DeCosta Became the Leader of the “Flock of Ravens” on Social Media – Baltimore Ravens Blog https://replicachristianlouboutinstore.com/how-lacie-decosta-became-the-leader-of-the-flock-of-ravens-on-social-media-baltimore-ravens-blog/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 11:34:29 +0000 https://replicachristianlouboutinstore.com/how-lacie-decosta-became-the-leader-of-the-flock-of-ravens-on-social-media-baltimore-ravens-blog/ OWINGS MILLS, Md. — Brie Brown is in her first year teaching kindergarten in the Baltimore area, and she tweeted out a wishlist for class items, adding the hashtag “Ravens Flock.” The next day, Brown received a package that caught his eye. “I was like, there’s no way,” Brown said. “I think someone is playing […]]]>

OWINGS MILLS, Md. — Brie Brown is in her first year teaching kindergarten in the Baltimore area, and she tweeted out a wishlist for class items, adding the hashtag “Ravens Flock.”

The next day, Brown received a package that caught his eye.

“I was like, there’s no way,” Brown said. “I think someone is playing a trick on me.”

Lacie DeCosta, wife of Baltimore Ravens general manager Eric DeCosta, had sent puzzles, educational toys and tons of books. DeCosta even sent Lamar Jackson’s children’s book, writing on the front page, “Keep dreaming big!” Always believe you can because you will!

Brown sent a direct message to DeCosta, who told him more was on the way. Ten minutes later, two more deliveries were made.

“Our library is stacked,” Brown said. “[The children] call them our class family.

Interactions like this are why some fans refer to DeCosta as “the Ravens’ social media mother.” She wanted to be a social worker after graduating from Randolph-Macon College in Virginia, but landed in the Ravens’ marketing department, where she worked for four years.

Although she no longer works for the team, DeCosta has found herself in a position where she can impact lives and use her social media platform to make a difference.

“There are so many people on social media who aren’t nice,” DeCosta said, “so I try to be an embodiment of positivity.”

A month after providing supplies for a kindergarten class, DeCosta volunteered for the food and clothing drive at Brown’s school. She spent the night loading boxes into people’s cars.

“There are only so many things you can go to,” DeCosta said. “I want to meet people. I want to touch that person. I want to change someone’s life by being in it. You go to these big fundraisers where you don’t really connect with people.”

A native of Baltimore, DeCosta is tied – literally – to the founding of the city’s sports teams. His father, George Litz, owned the company that supplied the bricks used to build the Ravens and Orioles stadiums.

For DeCosta, family and sports have continued to intertwine with Eric. The morning before Day 2 of the 2000 Draft, Eric ran to the home of Lacie’s family, who lived a few miles from the Ravens facility. Lacie’s dad thought Eric meant the players the Ravens had just signed. Eric had other news: he was going to propose to Lacie at Easter. Lacie and Eric married in 2001 and have three children: Jane, Michael and Jackson.

Lacie has carved her own niche in the Baltimore sports landscape thanks to Twitter. Her profile expanded on May 29, 2020, when she posted a photo — drawn by her cousin Will — of Ravens quarterback Jackson, who retweeted her. She quickly grew from several hundred followers to over 18,000.

“It was definitely uplifting”

When fans want to share news with the rest of the Ravens community, they usually tag two people: Jackson and Lacie.

Many of these cases are when fans share photos of their newborn babies. A fan asked Lacie for some positive vibes after her daughter broke her leg. Others asked for prayers after the death of a relative or friend.

Michael McBride, a Ravens fan from El Paso, Texas, was diagnosed with colon cancer and he started a GoFundMe page to help cover medical bills. He wanted to know if DeCosta could help spread the word.

In addition to donating, DeCosta provided encouraging words. McBride raised over $11,000.

“It really lifted my spirits because at that time there was so much uncertainty about my condition,” McBride said. “It was definitely uplifting, to say the least.”

DeCosta’s connections are extensive. Roman Tkach is a 29-year-old quality assurance engineer living in war-torn western Ukraine. When the long-distance Ravens fan wasn’t on social media for a while, DeCosta tweeted him to see how he was doing.

“I don’t know if it’s normal in American culture, but I’m not used to such kindness,” Tkach said. “I’m a complete stranger, living about 8,000 miles from Baltimore, just a random person on Twitter. You have to agree that actions like this show who the person is. To remember me, and even have thoughts and prayers for my safety, I feel like this world still has a chance.

“She just got very real on Twitter”

There are times when Lacie will also interact with Ravens players. She’ll snap playful photos of cornerback Marlon Humphrey for his coffee shots, the latest “Batman” movie, and dating.

As much as Lacie takes care of serious fan issues, she tries to keep social media fun. During the season, she handed out a jersey each week to fans who correctly answered a trivial question or guessed the player who recorded the game’s first sack. Two hours before the start of this year’s draft, she presented a gift card to the person who won the Ravens’ first-round selection. Fans are so invested in her Twitter account that they’ll DM her if she’s a little late with her daily morning post, which can include a quote from Kendrick Lamar or advice from her grandmother.

“She just got very real on Twitter,” Brown said. “And you can see she’s not doing this for looks. She’s not trying to be a socialite or anything like that. She’s just a Baltimore girl and she’s a fan, first and foremost. “

When Eric met Lacie, he knew how much she wanted to make a difference with people. He simply never anticipated that she would become such a popular face of the franchise on social media.

“She never lost her thirst to get involved, to make a difference and to help families,” Eric said. “She was able to use the Ravens as a way to accomplish what she wanted, which was to make it a better community.”

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Flash offensive a nice birthday present https://replicachristianlouboutinstore.com/flash-offensive-a-nice-birthday-present/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 08:04:28 +0000 https://replicachristianlouboutinstore.com/flash-offensive-a-nice-birthday-present/ CONWAY — Tom Sears said he didn’t expect his new age to be surpassed by his Eastern team’s points on the scoreboard. East beat West 54-9 on Saturday in the Arkansas High School Coaches Association All-Star Football Game at Estes Stadium in celebration of Sears’ 51st birthday. The East featured a trio of offensive weapons […]]]>

CONWAY — Tom Sears said he didn’t expect his new age to be surpassed by his Eastern team’s points on the scoreboard.

East beat West 54-9 on Saturday in the Arkansas High School Coaches Association All-Star Football Game at Estes Stadium in celebration of Sears’ 51st birthday.

The East featured a trio of offensive weapons that took turns terrorizing the West’s defense. El Dorado’s Jackie Washington, Cabot’s Braden Jay and McGehee’s Jody Easter combined for 330 receiving yards and six touchdowns. Late in the third quarter, Easter also got involved on the field, scoring on a late rush. Easter was named the game’s best guard with 168 all-around yards and two touchdowns.

Hot Springs Lakeside’s Chase Cross was the star offensive player for the West, finishing with four catches for 161 receiving yards and a touchdown.

West held a 9-7 lead after the first quarter thanks to a 55-yard touchdown pass from Benton’s Stran Smith to Cross. But this would be the West’s last offensive outing.

East outscored West 22-0 in the second quarter, thanks to a pair of touchdowns by Jay, another by Easter and a safety by Devin Brown of Clarendon.

East has scored 46 straight points with Nettleton’s Cameron Scarlett and Hoxie’s Cade Forrester splitting time at quarterback. Scarlett, who will play collegiately at Dodge City (Kan.) Community College, was named the game’s MVP after passing for 200 yards and three touchdowns.

Scarlett made several impressive throws, but said having as many guns as those on display for the East made her job much easier.

“It makes a difference day and night,” Scarlett said. “When you can sit there and have your receivers working for free, that’s money.”

Forrester nearly matched Scarlett’s numbers, throwing for 181 yards and three touchdowns.

“I think they both played very well,” said Sears, who coaches Hoxie. “I thought Cade was maybe a little tight at first. And then he hit a few and loosened up a bit.”

The Pulaski Academy Class 5A champion has rep on Saturday in kicker Vaughn Seelicke. He made his only field goal attempt and was responsible for the kickoffs. In typical AP fashion, the East used Seelicke to attempt onside kicks on multiple occasions, converting one with 5:56 left in the second quarter.

The East defense did its part, forcing multiple turnovers, leading to 17 points. West Memphis’ Malcolm Perry received the best defensive back award for his game, which was highlighted by a one-handed interception in the second quarter.

“We struggled a bit offensively all week because our defense is so good,” Sears said. “I knew that once we were here against someone else, everything would be fine.”

Scarlett echoed Sears’ sentiments, crediting players like Cabot’s Justin Sobezck, who had two sacks, with helping him prepare to face West.

“There are some beasts on that side of the defense, you know. They came out and they were going to be the best defense on the pitch,” Scarlett said. “I think playing against that during the week really prepared us for [play]. Sometimes size can be intimidating, especially when you’re, you know, a shorter guy. But going out there and training all week against a big defense and coming out here and showing what we can do.”

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One Hundred Heroes Bairstow lead stunning England v New Zealand rally https://replicachristianlouboutinstore.com/one-hundred-heroes-bairstow-lead-stunning-england-v-new-zealand-rally/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 18:58:13 +0000 https://replicachristianlouboutinstore.com/one-hundred-heroes-bairstow-lead-stunning-england-v-new-zealand-rally/ Published on: 06/24/2022 – 20:58Amended: 06/24/2022 – 20:56 Leeds (United Kingdom) (AFP) – Jonny Bairstow was once again a hundred heroes for England as debutant Jamie Overton played his part in a stunning fightback against New Zealand on Friday. England were in dire straits when the pair came together 55-6 in response to the Black […]]]>

Published on: Amended:

Leeds (United Kingdom) (AFP) – Jonny Bairstow was once again a hundred heroes for England as debutant Jamie Overton played his part in a stunning fightback against New Zealand on Friday.

England were in dire straits when the pair came together 55-6 in response to the Black Caps’ first 329 innings in the Third Test at Headingley.

Still, they finished day two 264-6, just 65 points behind.

Bairstow was 130 paces ahead of his Yorkshire home crowd, with fast bowler Overton, who has just a first-class cent, unbeaten on 89.

On a day when New Zealand all-rounder Daryl Mitchell compiled his third century in the series, Bairstow and Overton combined in an unbroken partnership of 209 – a new England record seventh wicket in a Test.

“It’s unbelievable,” Bairstow, whose superb 136 led England to a five-wicket win and a series win at Trent Bridge, told Sky Sports.

“This place (Headingley) means a lot to me. To be a boy from Yorkshire scoring a hundred tests at home is quite special.

“For Jamie (Overton) to play the way he did, on his debut, under pressure, to have the confidence to play the way he did against this New Zealand attack, that’s exceptional.”

England led 2-0 in the three-game series playing bold and aggressive cricket under their new management of captain Ben Stokes and coach Brendon McCullum.

But England returned to type on Friday in a frantic slump, with quick left-arm Trent Boult routing the first order in a superb swing-and-bowl spell that gave three wickets for nine runs from four overs.

Bairstow and Overton, disregarding the conventional wisdom that consolidation is needed after a batting slump, counterattacked in style, although the Yorkshireman was missed on the 27th when Neil Wagner dropped a return on a drive checked.

“Emotional” Bairstow

It was, however, a rare mistake on the part of Bairstow, whose 50-year-old managed just 51 balls.

Overton, selected ahead of twin brother Craig in place of the injured James Anderson, demonstrated a wide range of offensive hitting on a 68-ball fifty.

Bairstow, having reached fifth on 51 balls, finished his 10th hundred in 86 career Tests by knocking out Boult for a 15th four on 95 balls faced.

The 32-year-old son of late England wicket-keeper David Bairstow sprinted in celebration to the stand where his mother, Janet, was watching before stopping to wave to the cheers of the crowd.

“Any time you score a Test hundred, it’s emotional,” Bairstow said. “It means so much to me to play Test cricket for England.

“That’s the kind of guy I am. I wear my heart on my sleeve.”

Earlier, Alex Lees was knocked out of the fifth ball of England’s response by a superb Boult leg-cut before clearing Ollie Pope and Zak Crawley.

Southee then had England star batsman Joe Root trailed for five to leave England reeling at 21-4.

Although Stokes counterattacked by driving Southee for six, he could only chip Wagner halfway by attempting a similar shot.

Three balls later, Wagner had a second wicket in his first over of the series when Ben Foakes was plumb for nothing to leave England 55-6.

New Zealand had recovered 225-5, with Mitchell turning their 78 overnight into a run of 109.

In the process, he broke a 73-year-old New Zealand record for most runs in a series against England.

Mitchell has scored 482 goals this campaign, 20 more than Martin Donnelly in 1949.

Mitchell went 120 with Tom Blundell, who made 55 before he was lower than Matthew Potts, a borderline decision he was unable to review as the DRS were out of action at the time.

But Mitchell completed his last hundred fairy tales by running Jack Leach for six years.

Trying to repeat the shot, however, his 228-ball innings ended when a misguided spinner drive was well caught by Stokes, returning from halfway.

Leach, whose Test career was blighted by illness, injury and inconsistent selection, finished an impressive 5-100 in 38.3 overs.

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Powder League co-founders focus on showcasing culture in Salt Lake City https://replicachristianlouboutinstore.com/powder-league-co-founders-focus-on-showcasing-culture-in-salt-lake-city/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 18:52:39 +0000 https://replicachristianlouboutinstore.com/powder-league-co-founders-focus-on-showcasing-culture-in-salt-lake-city/ Powder League co-founder Neema Namdar warms up with a 3-point shot (Kaylee Shores) Estimated reading time: 4-5 minutes SALT LAKE CITY – In the small gymnasium at Judge Memorial High, hundreds of fans show up to listen to music, fashion and, of course, basketball. The Powder League is a pro-am basketball league in its third […]]]>

Powder League co-founder Neema Namdar warms up with a 3-point shot (Kaylee Shores)

Estimated reading time: 4-5 minutes

SALT LAKE CITY – In the small gymnasium at Judge Memorial High, hundreds of fans show up to listen to music, fashion and, of course, basketball.

The Powder League is a pro-am basketball league in its third year of operation, co-founded by Neema Namdar and Keegan Rembacz. It features current and former NBA players, college athletes, and serious hoops.

“A grown man’s AAU,” Namdar said.

The Powder League currently consists of nine teams, each named after its captain. Matches are played on Wednesday and Friday evenings, with a knockout tournament taking place after eight weeks of play.

So how did the Powder League come about?

Well, that was Namdar and Rembacz’s idea. The two friends each had their own idea for a basketball-centric event, and after sharing their ideas, the Powder League was born, with Namdar handling basketball operations while playing in the league and Rembacz dealing with graphic design. and administration.

After both graduating from Alta High, Rembacz served a church mission in Spain and Namdar played college basketball – first at Southern Utah, then Utah State University Eastern, then Hawaii Pacific University.

It was in Hawaii Pacific that Namdar found his inspiration for a pro-am league. Namdar took a course on special events, and the final project was to design an event. He wanted to create a basketball league featuring NBA names while giving fashion designers a place to sell clothes.

Around the same time, Rembacz had his own idea. A self-proclaimed hoop at heart, he claims to “live and breathe hoops”. The vision of the Powder League came to him in a dream, he said.

“Literally one night I woke up from this dream,” Rembacz said. “It was kind of like (the present-day Powder League) but more on a smaller scale with college kids dunking and music. I turned around and hit the note and went back to sleep.”

The day after Rembacz’s dream, he FaceTimed Namdar to tell him. Namdar convinced him to take the idea one step further and create a full pro-am league, and the ball rolling soon began. Just a week after their first call, they were already attending meetings and Rembacz was working on logos and graphics.

BYU alumna Yoeli Childs blocks a shot during a Powder League game at Judge Memorial High School.
BYU alumna Yoeli Childs blocks a shot during a Powder League game at Judge Memorial High School. (Photo: Kaylee Shores)

Detroit Pistons member Frank Jackson was crucial to the Powder League’s initial success. Namdar grew up with Jackson and the two remained close friends. Throughout the early stages, Jackson provided insight into Namdar and Rembacz and also helped them connect with other basketball players. From then on, the league was essentially word of mouth.

“Basically, I meet people through basketball,” Namdar said. “We just bond with guys and they come in and then they tell their friends and the word gets out there.”

It is important to note that the focus of the Powder League is not just basketball, but also culture.

“Where can you find that in Utah? asked Rembacz. “People think something like this can’t exist here, but it’s easy, someone just needs to kick it off. Everyone here loves basketball, fashion and music, so we combined it all. and made it an event.”

Starting this summer, the Powder League will expand beyond the initial nine-week summer season in hopes of giving fans more chances to experience the event. They are in talks to collaborate with Flanker Kitchen and Sporting Club to host a block party at Gateway Mall. The block party would also feature basketball, but would be another great opportunity for local clothing brands to showcase themselves.

“Ultimately, (having the music and the fashion designers) adds to the atmosphere, but it also helps these people more than we could ever know.” said Rembacz.

On the basketball side, the Powder League is also a great opportunity for players to get exposure.

Participating athletes have the chance to add more films to their portfolio – many players have career aspirations. Some of the athletes are already in the NBA or the G League, so their presence helps bring the level of competition to the next level as they work on their own game in the offseason.

Although the league has only been around for three years, it is just getting started.

Rembacz and Namdar have big plans for the future of the Powder League. Eventually, they want the league to hold events in neighboring states like Colorado and Montana. In Utah, they want the Powder League to have its own facility. They also discussed the possibility of working with the Utah Jazz to help organize events as well.

“We’re kind of in tune with what they’re doing and what they’re doing in the community,” Rembacz said. “One of our goals is to work with these big brands and put some of the smaller brands on the bigger stages.”

The Powder League takes place every Wednesday and Friday night at Judge Memorial High. Tickets can be purchased at the door.

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Russian sanctions hurt small Italian fashion producers https://replicachristianlouboutinstore.com/russian-sanctions-hurt-small-italian-fashion-producers/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 07:03:09 +0000 https://replicachristianlouboutinstore.com/russian-sanctions-hurt-small-italian-fashion-producers/ Milan— Beautiful Italian knitwear packed in boxes destined for retailers in Moscow, St. Petersburg and Kursk are stacked in a warehouse in Lombardy awaiting shipment. Although not subject to sanctions to punish Russia for invading Ukraine, the clothes are not expected to ship anytime soon. Missing payments from Russian retailers who ordered the clothes are […]]]>

Beautiful Italian knitwear packed in boxes destined for retailers in Moscow, St. Petersburg and Kursk are stacked in a warehouse in Lombardy awaiting shipment. Although not subject to sanctions to punish Russia for invading Ukraine, the clothes are not expected to ship anytime soon.

Missing payments from Russian retailers who ordered the clothes are piling up due to banking restrictions, putting pressure on small fashion producers like D. Exterior, a high-end knitwear company with 50 employees in the city north of Brescia.

Nadia Zanola, president of Cose di Maglia and owner of the D.Exterior brand, browses shelves of clothes in a warehouse of unsold clothes, in Brescia, Italy, June 14, 2022.

“It’s very painful. I have 2 million euros worth of goods in the warehouse, and if they can’t pay, I’ll be on my knees,” said D. Exterior owner Nadia Zanola, inspecting the warehouse of the brand she founded. in 1997 from the knitting business created by his parents in 1952.

Italy is the world’s largest producer of luxury goods, making 40% of high-end clothing, footwear and accessories. While Russia generates roughly 3% of Italian luxury’s 97 billion euro ($101 billion) annual revenue, it’s a significant chunk of business for some of the 80,000 small and medium-sized businesses which form the backbone of Italian fashion, according to industry officials. .

“We are talking about cutting 80% to 100% of the income from these companies,” said Fabio Pietrella, president of the fashion artisans’ federation Confartigianato.

Shoe-producing districts in the Marches and Veneto regions, and knitwear manufacturers in Umbria and Emilia-Romagna became particularly dependent on Russia.

“These are districts that connect the supply chain, and if it’s interrupted, not only is the business that closes harmed, but a whole system that helps make this country an economic powerhouse,” Pietrella said.

Workers iron clothes at the Cose di Maglia factory where the D.Exterior brand is produced, in Brescia, Italy, June 14, 2022.

Workers iron clothes at the Cose di Maglia factory where the D.Exterior brand is produced, in Brescia, Italy, June 14, 2022.

The Italian fashion world is best known for luxury houses like Gucci, Versace and Armani, which unveil their menswear collections in Milan this week. And some of the biggest names feature on a list compiled by Yale University professor Jeffrey Sonnenberg of major companies doing business in Russia since the war in Ukraine began.

“There are companies that continued to sell to Nazi Germany after the outbreak of World War II – we don’t celebrate them for that,” Sonnenberg said, calling any company that continues to do so “greedy”. business in Russia today.

He also pointed out that fashion companies do not have the grounds to issue humanitarian appeals to circumvent sanctions, voluntary or otherwise, as has been the case with agricultural companies and pharmaceutical companies.

Among those receiving a failing grade from Sonnenberg is Italy’s Benetton, who in a statement condemned the war but said he would continue business activities in Russia, including long-standing business and logistics partnerships and a network of stores supporting 600 families.

French conglomerate LVMH, meanwhile, temporarily closed 124 stores in Russia, while continuing to pay its 3,500 employees in Russia. Spanish group Inditex, owner of fast-fashion chain Zara, also temporarily closed 502 stores in Russia as well as its online sales, accounting for 8.5% of the group’s pre-tax profit.

Pietrella worries that a kind of Russophobia is setting in and demonizing business owners for trying to maintain ties with a longer-term view.

He branded criticism of some 40 shoemakers from the Marche region on Italy’s Adriatic coast a “witch hunt” for traveling to Russia for a trade fair during the war.

Cose di Maglia factory storekeeper Malik reviews boxes of unsold D.Exterior garments destined for stores in Moscow, in Brescia, Italy, June 14, 2022.

Cose di Maglia factory storekeeper Malik reviews boxes of unsold D.Exterior garments destined for stores in Moscow, in Brescia, Italy, June 14, 2022.

European Union sanctions against Russia tightened after Ukraine invasion, setting a wholesale maximum of 300 euros for each item shipped, removing luxury items from circulation but still targeting the upper middle class or rich Russians.

“Without a doubt, as a fashion federation, we have expressed our extreme concern over the aggression in Ukraine,” Pietrella said. “From an ethical point of view, it’s out of the question. But we have to think about our companies. Ethics is one thing. The market is another. The workers of a company are paid by the market, not by ethics.”

He said the 300 euro limit on sales was a ploy by European politicians that on paper allows trade with Russia despite the bureaucratic and financial hurdles that come with it, while protecting governments from having to provide rescue funds to the industry. He also called the government’s suggestions for finding alternative markets to Russia too easy.

“If there was another market, we would already be there,” Pietrella said.

At D. Exterior, exposure to Russia has gradually increased over the years to now represent 35-40% of turnover which reached 22 million euros before the pandemic, a flow which is also coming under new pressure in due to rising energy and raw material costs.

The company was already delivering its summer collection and taking orders for winter when Russia invaded on February 24. In March, Russian retailers were struggling to make payments.

A worker checks the quality of textiles from the D. Exterior production at the Cose di Maglia factory, in Brescia, Italy, June 14, 2022.

A worker checks the quality of textiles from the D. Exterior production at the Cose di Maglia factory, in Brescia, Italy, June 14, 2022.

Not only is Zanola stuck with some 4,000 spring and summer garments that she has little hope of shipping to Russian customers, she said she is contractually bound to continue producing winter orders. , risking $100,000 in labor and material costs if these could not be shipped. .

Over the years, his Russian customers have proven to be ideal customers, Zanola said. Not only do they pay on time, but they appreciate the work of D. Exterior’s knit designs.

After working so hard to grow her Russian clientele, she hates giving it up and doesn’t see a quick long-term replacement.

“If Russia was Putin, I wouldn’t go there. But since Russia is not just Putin, hopefully poor Russians will manage to pick themselves up,” she said.

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Lincoln-Sudbury girls’ lacrosse fall to Westwood in state semifinals https://replicachristianlouboutinstore.com/lincoln-sudbury-girls-lacrosse-fall-to-westwood-in-state-semifinals/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 13:32:31 +0000 https://replicachristianlouboutinstore.com/lincoln-sudbury-girls-lacrosse-fall-to-westwood-in-state-semifinals/ NATICK — Lincoln-Sudbury’s senior women’s lacrosse captain, Nicola Donlan, couldn’t stop smiling. It’s not something you’d expect to see from someone who saw their high school career come to a humble end. “This group of people is my favorite group of people,” Donlan said after the Warriors’ 16-2 loss to No. 2 Westwood in the […]]]>

NATICK — Lincoln-Sudbury’s senior women’s lacrosse captain, Nicola Donlan, couldn’t stop smiling.

It’s not something you’d expect to see from someone who saw their high school career come to a humble end.

“This group of people is my favorite group of people,” Donlan said after the Warriors’ 16-2 loss to No. 2 Westwood in the Division 1 semifinals on Thursday. “Throughout my four years of high school, I couldn’t be happier that this is the group I end it with, especially with these other seven seniors.

“The Great Eight, I just had a blast.”

The third-seeded Warriors, who advanced to their first state semifinal appearance in at least a decade, became the 48th casualty in the Wolverines’ winning streak. The last time Westwood lost a game was in 2019 when they fell to Notre Dame Academy (Hingham), 13-8, in the Southern Section final.

“I don’t think anyone thought we would be here given what we got last year,” LS coach Kallie Kelly said. “We knew, but I don’t think if you had to make a prediction at the start of the year it certainly wasn’t ‘LS are going to be in the Final Four’. It certainly wasn’t ‘LS are going to be the seeded n°3 in the slice.'”

Westwood (24-0) exerted its dominance by outscoring Lincoln-Sudbury, 9-1, in the first half. Reagan Malo started the second half with a goal to make it 9-2 but it was only Wolverines after that as they ended the game scoring seven unanswered goals.

“All credit goes to Westwood,” Kelly said. “They were probably the favorites this season. Obviously a super well trained and excellent program from top to bottom.

“To even be considered with these top four (teams) is a huge feather in our cap.”

Despite the loss, the Warriors (17-4) still have something to hang their hats on over the past four years.

“We have a group of little kids wearing Lincoln-Sudbury girls’ lacrosse shirts waiting to run around to hug the players,” Kelly said. “For us, we’ve created a spark around women’s lacrosse in Sudbury. In a community that’s obviously very well known for its lacrosse boys, these girls have taken us to a new level and we think there’s something about LS women’s lacrosse now and that’s such a proud point for us now.

“We are extremely proud of this group and it is led by wonderful seniors.”

While the season may have ended in disappointment for Lincoln-Sudbury, this senior class leaves the team in good hands.

“I think we’re all extremely lucky to be surrounded by such amazing people,” said senior goaltender Sofia Trevino. “Underclassmen are crazy. We’re all incredibly close, there’s not a single person on this team I wouldn’t trust my life to.”

“I can’t wait to see where they go in the future,” added Donlan, who will play lacrosse at Tufts University in the fall.

“They’re going to kill him,” Trevino concluded.

Ethan Winter is a senior multimedia sports reporter at the Daily News. He can be contacted at ewinter@wickedlocal.com. Follow him on Twitter @EWints.

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Calculating the Future of Math at Virginia Tech | VTX https://replicachristianlouboutinstore.com/calculating-the-future-of-math-at-virginia-tech-vtx/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 15:01:17 +0000 https://replicachristianlouboutinstore.com/calculating-the-future-of-math-at-virginia-tech-vtx/ Virginia Tech Leaders college of science made plans before Virginia Tech Visitors Council earlier this month for a series of improvements designed to once again make the university a leader in undergraduate studies math education. The changes will initially take place in courses offered in the Math Emporium, former acting dean of the College of […]]]>

Virginia Tech Leaders college of science made plans before Virginia Tech Visitors Council earlier this month for a series of improvements designed to once again make the university a leader in undergraduate studies math education.

The changes will initially take place in courses offered in the Math Emporium, former acting dean of the College of Science Ron Fricker and Trish Hammer, associate dean for faculty affairs and graduate studies, told the Board of Visitors.

While not all of the changes are in place yet, the goal is to give students more flexibility in how they learn math. The Math Emporium’s self-paced, instructor-assisted format works well for some students, but others do better in traditional instructor-led classroom learning.

“People learn differently,” Fricker said, “and Virginia Tech students will now have the flexibility to choose the learning style in which they do best.”

Math education touches almost every student who comes to Virginia Tech. Over 98% of students take at least one course in the College of Science, due to the demands that students in engineering, business, architecture, and other majors have in foundational courses such as math and chemistry.

“Mathematics education is so important that we need to proceed with caution,” said Hammer, who earned his bachelor’s, master’s and doctorate degrees in mathematics at Virginia Tech. “It’s important that we act strategically and thoughtfully and get it right.”

Math courses make up an astounding 16 credit hours taught at Virginia Tech. When the Math Emporium opened its doors more than two decades ago, it was not only hailed as the cutting edge of math education, but the Virginia Tech model was adopted at many universities across the country. . The method of self-paced math lessons in large halls with hundreds of students in front of computers and traveling instructors is now widely known as the “emporium model”.

But over the years critics have emerged, calling it “big and impersonal”. The Emporium may have been innovative in its heyday, but Hammer said now is the time to recreate a new model based on everything learned over the past two decades. The college will also incorporate innovations in teaching methods that math teachers have adapted during the COVID-19 pandemic, Hammer said.

“Imagine a ‘studio day’ in your introductory math class,” Hammer said. “It will be very interactive. It will have a Math Emporium flavor, with walking instructors and students able to work independently and then get help when they need it.

“Our goal is a state-of-the-art blend of both models.”

The timing is still uncertain, but changes to math education at Virginia Tech will also result in a move away from the well-known Math Emporium location at University Mall. It’s where 25 years ago, Virginia Tech spent $2 million to renovate a former Rose’s department store into an Emporium.

Hammer and Fricker also told the Board of Visitors that the adaptations are not simply a move away from Emporium-style teaching and a return to the traditional model—essentially, lecture three days a week and recitation on the fourth day.

The changes will mean a smaller physical space on campus that will facilitate a more expansive virtual experience – but only for those who choose to go that route.

Kevin Pitts, who took over as dean of the College of Science on June 13, said the changes would put math education at Virginia Tech on a path that demonstrates its commitment to finding the best ways to educate students in ‘today.

“We envision this moving towards a nice mix of traditional math instruction, reinforced by what worked well at the Emporium,” Pitts said. “It’s not just about shrinking the Emporium; rather, it’s about moving towards an exciting, cutting-edge future.

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Kent State Soccer welcomes eight new flashes for the 2022 season https://replicachristianlouboutinstore.com/kent-state-soccer-welcomes-eight-new-flashes-for-the-2022-season/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 15:39:08 +0000 https://replicachristianlouboutinstore.com/kent-state-soccer-welcomes-eight-new-flashes-for-the-2022-season/ History links Kent, Ohio- The Kent State football team will welcome a new class of eight incoming freshmen for the upcoming Fall 2022 season as the Flashes look to build on an appearance in the Mid-American Conference Championship Game 2021. With the majority of a solid backline returning for the new campaign, […]]]>

Kent, Ohio- The Kent State football team will welcome a new class of eight incoming freshmen for the upcoming Fall 2022 season as the Flashes look to build on an appearance in the Mid-American Conference Championship Game 2021.

With the majority of a solid backline returning for the new campaign, this incoming class features three natural forwards and four midfielders who should help add some spark to an already potent Golden Flash Attack.

“We are thrilled to have this class join us,” the Kent State head coach said. Rob Marinaro said. “This is a wonderful group of student-athletes who know how to succeed on and off the field. We can’t wait to get started with them and see their impact on the Kent State family.”

Mary Kate Lape – Striker
Connellsville, Pennsylvania

As a forward for Connellsville High School and the Pittsburgh Riverhounds, Lape was touted as an energetic athlete throughout the recruiting process. She was named to the Academy Select and ODP state teams and was selected nationally for the 2018 USL Experience with Phoenix Rising FC as a rookie, while also earning an invite to football coaching American. Lape was also drafted four times in all counties and four times in all sections during his high school career.

Jillian Marvin – Outside Front / Back
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

In her four years as a starter, Marvin has impressed as a versatile all-court athlete. She earned WPIAL Big 5-6A All-Conference All-Section honors and was named to the “Observer-Reporter All-American Watchlist”. Marvin was also named one of the Mid America Conference’s Top 30 Players as a team captain for the Beadling. Soccer Club She scored 45 goals and 35 assists throughout her high school career and will be pursuing a nursing degree at Kent State.

Katerina Kostouros – Midfielder
Cave Creek, Arizona

As a four-year starter and Cactus Shadows high school letter winner, Kostouros was named to the Arizona All-Area First Team and earned Offensive Player of the Year honors during his tenure. senior campaign. She racked up 25 goals and 23 assists during her tenure as Falcon, adding valuable experience to her resume as a member of the SC Del Sol Girls Academy Club squad where she was named to the squad. of the western ODP region of Arizona. Kostouros will be pursuing a fashion design major while attending Kent State.

Julia Kempf – Midfielder
Vernon Hills, Ill.

Kempf started his career at Vernon Hills High School with a bang and never looked back, leading his team with 12 goals in his freshman season and coming away with the single-season assist record at age 16. She was also a vital part of Chicago FC United. club where she became a two-time State Cup champion and a qualifier for the 2022 USYS National Championship. Kempf also retained her place as a member of the National Honors Society and became a recipient of the Seal of Biliteracy. While in the Blue and Gold, she will pursue a degree in Secondary Mathematics Education.

Kelsey Salopek – Midfielder
Munhall, Pennsylvania

Salopek wreaked havoc on opposing defenses during his time at Steel Valley High School, scoring 117 goals and assisting 72 more from his spot in midfield. His serve earned him the titles of Moe Rosensteel and Post-Gazette Player of the Year. The former Tribune FAB 15 team member also loaned his services to club side Century FC, and the National Honors Society member will be pursuing a nursing major at Kent State.

Taylor English – Midfielder
Aurora, Illinois

A product of Oswego East High School, English was a member of its varsity team in both freshman and senior year while playing for club team Sockers FC Chicago. English helped the Sockers to a 2017 Midwest Championship, and the team was a runner-up for the 2017 National Championship. She was a high honor roll member in all eight semesters, and both an AP and Illinois scholarship winner. Scholar. While at Kent State, Taylor plans to major in interior design.

Abby Breitschuh – Centre-back / Outside defender
Hills of Rochester, Michigan

As a member of the Nationals Girls Academy club team, Breitschuh helped his team win a GA National Championship in 2021, the crowning achievement of a great club career. The lone defenseman in this year’s signing class was a talented multi-sport athlete, playing football and basketball for Rochester High School in Michigan, and winning a league championship on hardwood for the Falcons in 2021- 22. Breitschuh will specialize in marketing and advertising while playing for the Flashes.

Bella DaPra – Midfielder
Canonsburg, Pennsylvania

Another Pennsylvania product, DePra spent his high school career playing for the Century United club team as well as Canon-McMillan High School. She was twice named to the ODP All-Region team, making the IMG Select team and receiving an invitation to the National Training Center. DaPra will major in fashion merchandising with a minor in marketing while at Kent State.

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Stone Bridge softball wins state title on consecutive pitches https://replicachristianlouboutinstore.com/stone-bridge-softball-wins-state-title-on-consecutive-pitches/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 23:22:44 +0000 https://replicachristianlouboutinstore.com/stone-bridge-softball-wins-state-title-on-consecutive-pitches/ Placeholder while loading article actions Stone Bridge softball coach Billy Rice had questions about his inexperienced team heading into this spring season. Could this new batch of Bulldogs escalate? Would they deliver a timely at-bat if needed? The answers were confirmed in the Class 5 title match on Saturday, as Stone Bridge beat Hickory, 2-1, […]]]>
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Stone Bridge softball coach Billy Rice had questions about his inexperienced team heading into this spring season. Could this new batch of Bulldogs escalate? Would they deliver a timely at-bat if needed?

The answers were confirmed in the Class 5 title match on Saturday, as Stone Bridge beat Hickory, 2-1, at Riverside High in Leesburg. This is the second state title for the program, which first reigned in 2019.

A day after pitching a perfect game against Granby in the state semifinals, junior Kayla Fekel shone again for the Bulldogs, striking out 11 without stepping on a batter. Fekel’s brilliance kept Stone Bridge alive while the attack didn’t generate much throughout the game.

With the score tied at 1 heading into the seventh inning, Fekel retired back-to-back batters and then grounded out to give the Bulldogs a chance to win in the bottom half.

“Kayla just got going in the top of the seventh, stopped them, really put the pressure on them,” Rice said.

Junior Annie Waisley tied on six pitches in the bottom of the seventh, and Mairin McCarthy singled to bring Fekel to the plate with the chance to win it for the Bulldogs (22-6). Fekel was hit on the second pitch of her at-bat, loading the bases with one out for sophomore Jackie Yeager.

Yeager saw the second throw of her own stick screaming at her moments later. The pitch hit Yeager and the pain quickly turned to excitement as Stone Bridge emerged victorious.

“It was so hard our runner on third couldn’t tell it was a hit-per-pitch,” Rice said. “She thought maybe it was a foul ball because she saw the umpire’s hands go up for a dead ball and then she stopped and started to come back in third.”

“Go score, Mairin!” Rice shouted.

McCarthy hit home, and the Bulldogs did. For Rice, it was his team’s development into a confident group that helped his players land their shots and achieve victory in dramatic, yet odd ways.

“[Waisley] won because she was disciplined, same with Mairin,” Rice said. “They were very disciplined at the plate at the end because we saw that [Hickory’s pitcher] was struggling a bit, and as a group they managed to get that one through.

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‘Indigenous fashion arts is about breaking gender roles and binaries’ | Things to do https://replicachristianlouboutinstore.com/indigenous-fashion-arts-is-about-breaking-gender-roles-and-binaries-things-to-do/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 23:36:07 +0000 https://replicachristianlouboutinstore.com/indigenous-fashion-arts-is-about-breaking-gender-roles-and-binaries-things-to-do/ Keenan Simik Komaksiutiksak, an urban two-spirited Inuk dancer and artist, will take to the catwalks, hoping to break down traditional gender roles and binaries. Simik, 24, from the small community of Rankin Inlet in Nunavut, started working full-time as a professional performer in dance and art performances at 18 and will participate in the Aboriginal […]]]>

Keenan Simik Komaksiutiksak, an urban two-spirited Inuk dancer and artist, will take to the catwalks, hoping to break down traditional gender roles and binaries.

Simik, 24, from the small community of Rankin Inlet in Nunavut, started working full-time as a professional performer in dance and art performances at 18 and will participate in the Aboriginal Fashion Arts Festival this year from June 9-12 at Harbourfront Center in Toronto. The festival, led largely by Indigenous women, connects audiences and artists to a growing Indigenous fashion movement and community.

“I work in the mostly Eurocentric sector as a contemporary dancer and I’m often the only Inuk and the only Indigenous person in arts spaces. It’s nice to connect with Indigenous people and talk about our cultures. It’s a looping moment of being around all these beautiful native artists. It’s the representation and sense of community that I wanted to see as a kid.

At the Toronto festival, Simik will participate in all four shows, displaying the looks of Indigenous artists and designers from across Turtle Island. For Simik, this is their first modeling gig and an opportunity to be the two-spirit Inuk representation they wanted to grow.

“I think it’s important to represent different Indigenous cultures and gender identities. When you see someone walking the track and you can see yourself in that person, that’s a starting point for young people because, ‘Oh, that’s something I can do.'”

Simik, who lives in Montreal, is a contemporary and improvisational dancer, choreographer and circus artist who credits her mother with sparking her passion for the arts and dance. Simik remembers playing hockey for a year when he was young, until his mother asked him if he wanted to take dance lessons.

“It was the start of my career as a dancer, and it’s something I fell in love with right away. Going to my first class, I was like, ‘Oh my God, that makes me the person happiest ever.”

Simik grew up in Ottawa, where they began dance lessons and experienced the limits of gender roles and the “otherness” of people who didn’t fit Eurocentric looks of dance. Simik, who has handmade traditional Tunniit facial tattoos, describes the industry as unwelcoming of traditional tattoos following the Catholic Church’s ban on the practice centuries ago.

“In the dance industry, there are these rules of not getting face tattoos, not getting face tattoos and so on. But as an Inuk, tattooing is an integral part of our culture, especially now with the revitalization of the tattoo. That’s another reason I have my tattoos, to show people that you can be a dancer and compete. You can do whatever you want. It’s not going to hold you back. .”

For Simik, modeling at the Indigenous Fashion Arts Festival is an opportunity to break down traditional gender roles and binaries. The festival will also add new cultural connections and knowledge to their repertoire, as they hope to create opportunities for Indigenous youth to learn contemporary arts.

“I love being on stage and seeing the audience react to different things. I can’t wait to play with all the looks. I’m going to do masculine looks, then feminine, wear dresses that are very similar to my personality. I’m great androgynous. My goal in life is to develop a dance and circus program to teach young people how to dance. I want to see people in their own communities have the opportunity to learn this stuff. I’m excited to create more relationships and dancing with other aboriginal artists I want to see other people’s experiences and how they move.

The Indigenous Fashion Arts Festival, formerly known as Indigenous Fashion Week Toronto, takes place in Toronto from June 9-12 and showcases Indigenous designers, artists and traditional practices in a downtown atmosphere.

Kierstin Williams is Anishinaabekwe from Garden River First Nation and a student journalist.

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