high school – Replica Christian Louboutin Store http://replicachristianlouboutinstore.com/ Sun, 17 Apr 2022 22:32:10 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://replicachristianlouboutinstore.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-39.png high school – Replica Christian Louboutin Store http://replicachristianlouboutinstore.com/ 32 32 Obituary of Dr. Miriam Hederman O’Brien: Pioneer for Women https://replicachristianlouboutinstore.com/obituary-of-dr-miriam-hederman-obrien-pioneer-for-women/ Sat, 19 Mar 2022 00:56:00 +0000 https://replicachristianlouboutinstore.com/obituary-of-dr-miriam-hederman-obrien-pioneer-for-women/ Dr. Miriam Hederman O’BrienBirth: June 6, 1932Died: March 14, 2022 Although she had an unusual upbringing – being mostly home-schooled until the age of 12, but taking piano lessons with Dr Kuypers at Newbridge College while her mother went about her business – Miriam Hederman has always been an extraordinary person. With two brothers who […]]]>

Dr. Miriam Hederman O’Brien
Birth: June 6, 1932
Died: March 14, 2022

Although she had an unusual upbringing – being mostly home-schooled until the age of 12, but taking piano lessons with Dr Kuypers at Newbridge College while her mother went about her business – Miriam Hederman has always been an extraordinary person.

With two brothers who were more than ten years older, she grew up in a family of adults and, with one a lawyer and the other a priest, her memories of the dinner table were discussions, debates and a position statement that is clear, concise and, of course, with corroborated evidence.

Sent to Mount Anville at the age of 13, she was part of a class of 10. When she finished high school in Ireland at the age of 16, she was sent to Rome for a year, taking French lessons while learning Italian. Her sheltered education hardly prepared her for Italian life, but her experience germinated her love of Europe and her awareness of the inequalities of society.

Although her original plan was to become a concert pianist, in Rome she decided she wasn’t good enough to be world class so she made her mark on another stage.

She decided to study law, but her father, worried that she needed something to fall back on, insisted that she also take a degree in modern languages. So in 1950 she returned home to attend University College Dublin and at the same time the King’s Inns. She loved UCD and entered student life with vigor, joining 11 student societies. She graduated with a BA in 1953 and was called to the Bar in 1956.

Since her student days, she had been an active member of Pax Romana and the European Youth Movement. In 1954, along with Garret Fitzgerald, Donal Barrington and David Thornley, she was a founding member of Tuairim, a society for people between the ages of 21 and 40 which provided a forum for informed and unbiased discussion of economics, politics, social sciences, education and the arts.

Rather than pursue a career in law, she became a journalist. She had started broadcasting in France as a student and in her early years of journalism she was a prolific writer. She wrote about global figures who sought to improve the lives of their people. She interviewed prominent Irish politicians, industry leaders and people of interest to her. She addressed topics such as education and the place of women in society. His work has appeared in the Irish Independent, the Irish Press, Interplay, an international current affairs magazine published in New York, Pioneer Magazine and Creation Fashion magazine, where his was the thought-provoking article. She worked freelance with Radio Éireann and RTÉ throughout the 1960s.

Life as a freelance journalist was hardly lucrative, and she also worked as a translator from French and Italian and as a book reviewer.

Not content with writing or discussing societal issues, she has actively campaigned for equality and social justice on many fronts.

She met her husband Bill (William S O’Brien) at university debates and they spent their married life with their five children in Malahide where they were immersed in the community, most notably at the Grove Lawn Tennis Club, a tennis club. four grass pitches with 400 junior members.

He was legal agent for the National Bank and when it merged with the Bank of Ireland practiced at Bell, Brannigan, O’Donnell and O’Brien. It is a great testament to him that while the marriage ban has prevented many Irish women from working and fulfilling their careers or intellectual potential, it has encouraged her to pursue whatever challenge interests her. Bill passed away in 2016.

Not content with writing or discussing societal issues, she has actively campaigned for equality and social justice on many fronts. Among her papers (which are in the UCD archives) is a letter from the professor of zoology at UCD written in 1967 in response to her request for support for the advancement of women’s careers. “I don’t see if I can contribute much to the task you are undertaking in regard to the employment of women in fairly high positions…when it comes to marrying off one of them, their success as college employees changes as their attention is split between home and college duties My opinion is that women should retire upon marriage as they do in public service. to say that the professor’s opinion did not sway her as she campaigned for women throughout her own career.

From her involvement with the Traveler Cara Park site in the 1970s to forming the Sr Stephen Fund for Mount Carmel School in the heart of Dublin 1 in the 2000s with her former Mount Anville class, she has always had a moving cause and worked energetically to bring practical benefits to those she supported.

Although she was never tempted to enter politics, she was actively involved in formulating policy recommendations through organizations such as the Foundation for Fiscal Studies, the NESC, the Irish Center for European Law and the Statistical & Social Inquiry Society of Ireland, and its influence has spanned many disciplines.

She was a member and then president of the Broadcasting Complaints Commission. She also served on the Advertising Standards Authority. She was a member of the Top Level Appointments Committee for senior positions in the Irish Civil Service from 1992 to 1998.

From the 1950s, when she was involved in the European Youth Campaign throughout the following decades, she has always been active in European affairs. Since her student years, she has been an active member of the Irish Council of the European Movement.

Dr. Miriam Hederman O’Brien, Chair of the Commission on Taxation. Photography: Tom Lawlor

Over the next five years, the commission was to publish five reports covering the full range of taxation and administration in Ireland.

In 1979, while campaigning to encourage women to vote in the first elections for the European Parliament, public sentiment in Ireland was more focused on the unfairness of the Irish tax system and, after mass marches, the government established the Commission on Taxation with Miriam Hederman O’Brien as chair. Over the next five years, the commission was to publish five reports covering the full range of taxation and administration in Ireland.

Commissions and investigations

Her ability to get to the heart of the matter, to allow the airing of contested opinions and to bring a subject to a conclusive decision has earned her the call to chair a number of controversial and sensitive commissions and inquiries.

  • North Dublin Action Plan (1998)
  • Eastern Health Board Region Youth Homelessness Forum (2000)
  • Advisory Group on Elective Trauma and Orthopedic Services for the North Eastern Health Board (1998)
  • Independent review of Notre-Dame de Lourdes Hospital, commissioned by the then North Eastern Health Board, which reported in 1995
  • Expert Group Inquiry into Blood Transfusion Service Board 1995 (regarding blood contamination which led to the infection of women receiving blood transfusions with Hepatitis C)
  • Commission on the financing of health services 1989
  • Inspector at Letterkenny Regional College 1994
  • Renovation of Carlow Cathedral

In 1985 she accepted an appointment to the board of Allied Irish Banks (AIB), becoming the first woman to sit on the board of an Irish plc. Faithful to the principles of good governance, it was deeply disturbed by the revelations of the Dirt (tax withholding interest on deposits) in 1993.

She was appointed Chancellor of the University of Limerick in 1998, becoming the first woman to hold this position at a university in Ireland.

And all the while she has supported outside interests in music and culture. She was Director of the Dublin Grand Opera Society from 1982 to 1987. She was Director and then President of Music Network, from 1995 to 2007, whose mandate was to bring live classical performances to venues across the country. She was President of the International Executive of the European Cultural Foundation from 1996 to 2003 and, through this organization, encouraged studies to promote intercultural exchange.

She was also Trustee of the Louvain Development Trust for the Irish Institute of European Affairs in Belgium from 1982 to 1999. Her involvement in European organizations kept her in touch with peers across the continent.

She adopted a style of influencing that involved a lot of charm, listening and encouragement. She was a crusader in her own unique way

The subject of her doctorate from Trinity College Dublin was The Road to Europe, Irish attitudes to European integration 1948-1961, published by the Institute for Public Affairs in 1983. She lectured regularly at the University of Limerick, Trinity College Dublin, University College Liège and elsewhere. With such knowledge of Ireland’s path to EU membership, it’s no surprise that she took a keen interest in other countries when applying for membership.

As part of the Killeen Fellowship at Trinity, she undertook post-doctoral studies on exchange training, education and vocational training between Ireland and Poland, Hungary and Czechoslovakia. She was awarded the Silver Medal of the European Order of Merit in 1984 and the Order of Merit from the President of Poland in 1992.

Aware of the constraints of being a woman and coming from a small island quite far away, she adopted a style of influence that involved a lot of charm, listening and encouragement. She was a crusader in her own way.

Her last public service was as chairman of Dublin’s joint standing maternity committee from 1997. She stepped down in recent years, knowing that her declining health was hampering her abilities. Fiercely demanding of herself, her deteriorating health was devastating to her. Not being able to “do” was a difficult cross to bear for such a phenomenal woman.

She received honorary doctorates from the Pontifical University of Maynooth in 1995, the National University of Ireland in 2001, the University of Ulster in 2002 and the University of Limerick in 2008. She was elected at the Royal Irish Academy in 2005.

In 2013, she received an award for being a trailblazer for women by WXN.

In her keynote address to an extraordinary assembly of women at the presentation, she spoke passionately about the need for women to be active public servants, to aim for a better society by getting involved in the processes of change. After dinner, as she slipped away – she had snuck out of the hospital to attend – a very young woman caught up with her to tell her she was an inspiration. That evening, she told the room “I come back, again and again, to the importance of women’s contribution to society and to public service. In my experience, women have an innate ability to examine theory and relate it to the reality of life – and that’s actually how you solve societal problems. She may have spoken generally, but to those who knew and admired her, those words reflected her own purpose, contribution and legacy.

She is survived by her five children: Donat, Aoife, Eilis, Dervilla and Murrough and her 10 grandchildren.

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St. Luke’s Mackenzie Nelson honored with Gatorade award after challenging himself to be better https://replicachristianlouboutinstore.com/st-lukes-mackenzie-nelson-honored-with-gatorade-award-after-challenging-himself-to-be-better/ Sat, 12 Mar 2022 23:06:53 +0000 https://replicachristianlouboutinstore.com/st-lukes-mackenzie-nelson-honored-with-gatorade-award-after-challenging-himself-to-be-better/ With 27 college basketball scholarship offers at last count, Mackenzie Nelson said she will evaluate all opportunities in her recruiting process. “I didn’t say no to anybody,” the St. Luke junior guard said. “I’m not that person that if I get an offer from a school, I have to go there and commit right away. […]]]>

With 27 college basketball scholarship offers at last count, Mackenzie Nelson said she will evaluate all opportunities in her recruiting process.

“I didn’t say no to anybody,” the St. Luke junior guard said. “I’m not that person that if I get an offer from a school, I have to go there and commit right away. I am completely open.

There was one impressive line cemented in Nelson’s career resume on Thursday: 2021-22 Gatorade Connecticut Girls Basketball Player of the Year.

“Obviously we had a fantastic season as a team until that tough loss to Brooks,” Nelson said. “It got us attention and a chance to show off all my hard work. It’s huge for me. I’m very grateful.

“I wasn’t surprised at all (Nelson won),” St. Luke’s coach Matt Ward said. “She’s an amazing player. Playing across New England, people could see that. I thought it would be between Mackenzie and (senior teammate) Caroline Lau and they wouldn’t have gone wrong picking either one or the other.

While the CIAC State Tournament is going excitingly for multiple divisions across the championships at Mohegan Sun, it would be difficult to produce the quality of competition at the NEPSAC Class B Championship this past Sunday at Brooks School in North Andover, Mass.

Brooks had Massachusetts Gatorade winner Taina Mair and 6-2 Samantha Dewey, ranked second in New England behind Mair in the Class of 2022 by Prep Girls Hoops. Brooks also had the home court advantage.

St. Luke’s, which went 26-0 as the FAA champion, had Lau, ranked No. 7, and Nelson, considered New England’s best player in the class of 23. ESPN HoopGurlz ranked Nelson 42nd in the country in his class.

The result was a classic.

Brooks won 76-75 on Mair’s field goal against a double team with 4.4 seconds left in overtime. Headed to BC, Mair scored 37 points. Nelson? Well, she was 45.

“I didn’t really get a chance to fully grasp it in the moment, it’s so intense and we lost,” Ward said. “I went back and watched the game twice, once as a coach, once as a fan. It was the best high school game I’ve ever seen.

“They didn’t help much at first and Mackenzie was able to get whatever she wanted. Since they were helping out, she was really good at giving out open looks. She was locked up. »

Nelson did not attend the New Canaan school when she lost to Brooks, 63-45, in the 2020 NEPSAC B final. She was a freshman at Greenwich High, taking first-grade honors GameTimeCT team and seeing their season end before the state semifinals due to the COVID outbreak.

“It was heartbreaking for us,” Nelson said.

With the schedule severely limited last year due to COVID, there was no chance of avenging Brooks’ loss. Nelson felt the consequences.

“Whenever we had bad practice or had fun, we moaned and moaned, Ward would say, ‘Shell drill.'” she said. “That’s when he mentioned Brooks. It was the motivation. This has become our goal. »

It was the last game of his stellar career at St. Luke’s for Lau, who will play at Northwestern. Traveling three hours to and Brooks, Nelson said the team recognized there was a lot at stake.

“We were playing fantastically, up 10 (after three quarters),” Nelson said. “We also knew Brooks would go for a run. They went up in the fourth quarter. I was frustrated and (Ward) pulled me aside and said, “Look, we only have to win by one point.”

St. Luke’s tied the game to force overtime. Still, it would be Brooks who would win by one point.

“It was a great game to be in,” Nelson said. “I really felt for Caroline (who had 21 points), the coaches and everyone who was part of the game (2020). It was the best game we’ve played all year. It’s hard to comparing AAU and high school, two different games, but that was the level of competition.

There’s a strong family dynamic at play at St. Luke’s, especially within the women’s basketball team. Ward’s team had three sets of sisters: Mackenzie and Camdyn (freshman); Caroline and Sara (sophomore) Lau from Westport; Ava (junior) and Emma (first year) Sollenne from Greenwich.

Mackenzie and Ava Sollenne have known each other since kindergarten and have played basketball together since third grade in the Greenwich Recreational League.

“Family dynamics? It’s great,” Nelson said. “With my own sister, I’m going to say, ‘Make your free throws.’ I wouldn’t say that to anyone else, but I think it pushes us and gives us something to fight for. It’s the love of family. We have a bond.

“It’s a lot of fun for me,” Ward said. “It’s unique. They are all so different. There is a sister who comes and goes in training. They are sisters. The common denominator is that they all love basketball. We always say (when breaking up a huddle): “1-2-3, family!” So we are all a bit together.

Ward saw Nelson play against St. Luke’s Junior University when she was in eighth grade. He told his parents about his school attendance.

“She was ready to come, but also wanted to try out high school to see how it went,” Ward said. “I certainly understood. At some point during this (first year) year, I reached out again to see if there was any interest.

There was. Nelson said it was not an easy decision. She had a great first year. Greenwich is proud of its academics. The competition, she says, went well. She felt like she was being challenged in the games.

“It was more about being challenged every day,” Nelson said. “I wanted to defend and have someone to defend me. Caroline and I pushed each other. We went back and forth every practice. It’s not like we hurt each other, but it was really good competition. That’s what I wasn’t getting at Greenwich and could get at St. Luke’s.

Sollenne decided to attend Saint-Luc about a month after Nelson.

Those intense scrums between teams led by Lau and Nelson? “My team has won more times,” Nelson volunteered. A little sister needle.

“One thing that I often talk to Mackenzie about is that she’s so talented, so athletic that sometimes she can rely on it a little too much,” Ward said. “I don’t want her to lose sight of the fundamentals she will need at the next level. Small things she can obviously do, like pulling out a good box every time.

“His filming went very well his year. She shot like 35 percent on three. She walks over to the basket. If she can develop a consistent mid-range game, she’ll be really hard to stop. Defense, no worries.

Nelson averaged 22 points, 4.5 rebounds, three assists and five steals.

“I’m happy with my ability to handle the ball,” Nelson said. “I think I kind of bring a level of balance and composure, I go at my own pace, I run when I want to run. I also managed to get to the basket. Last season was also the best I’ve ever shot, but I still think I can shoot a better percentage.

With an enrollment of approximately 2,750 students in grades 9 through 12, Greenwich is the second largest high school in Connecticut. A 29-minute commute each morning—Mackenzie timed it—takes him to St. Luke’s, which has fewer than 600 students in grades 5 through 12.

“I was 30 in a class at Greenwich and now there are 11,” said Nelson, who carries a 3.84 GPA. “I usually sit up front anyway. I’m not shy when it comes to raising my hand.

“Greenwich is huge and St Luke’s is pretty much the opposite. I think it was a good experience until college. I learned to adapt. Almost everyone knows everyone at St. Luke’s.

And that’s what made the accidental death of St. Luke’s second student, Teddy Balkind, in a hockey game particularly tragic for the students.

“I didn’t know Teddy personally, but a lot of our second graders were friends of Teddy and a lot of us are friends with his sister,” Nelson said. “It’s a very small world. The drama has affected all of us, the whole team.

“It was obviously in the middle of the basketball season. We practiced, or (would have) just gone and shot the ball. Don’t worry instead of sitting in your room. At first it was the last thing you wanted to do, but it became a springboard for a lot of people to help us move forward. Basketball has become our light at the end of the tunnel.

jeff.jacobs@hearstmediact.com; @jeffjacobs123

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20-50-100 years ago — March 2 | News https://replicachristianlouboutinstore.com/20-50-100-years-ago-march-2-news/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://replicachristianlouboutinstore.com/20-50-100-years-ago-march-2-news/ Percy J. Hinton, a former serviceman, with a record of three years and six months in the trenches, accompanied by his wife and a two-and-a-half-year-old child, arrived in this town yesterday afternoon, on foot , en route from San Francisco, California, to their home in Hoboken, NJ They were given supper and looked after overnight […]]]>

Percy J. Hinton, a former serviceman, with a record of three years and six months in the trenches, accompanied by his wife and a two-and-a-half-year-old child, arrived in this town yesterday afternoon, on foot , en route from San Francisco, California, to their home in Hoboken, NJ They were given supper and looked after overnight by Capt. Luther T. Shifflet, of the Salvation Army, and departed this morning for Baltimore . Hinton, his wife and child left San Francisco on Christmas Day with fifteen cents in their pocket. They return home with no money and have generally been treated well along the way.

Despite the small crowd due to inclement weather, the public sale at the H. Fulton Nicodemus Farm on New Design Road near Buckeystown Station yesterday fetched around $2,000. The bidding was lively. Horses showed the widest price range. They fetched between $77.50 and $105. Cows sold between $35 and $90.

Two bids, the only ones received for the sale of the goodwill and goodwill of the firm B. Rosenour et Fils, local clothing merchants, were opened Wednesday at noon at the National Bank of Citizens. Both offers were rejected because the amounts offered were considered too low. It is expected that a large liquidation sale will now be organized to sell off the available stock.

Hood College may be becoming a hotbed for New York’s top models. In 1962, Sunny Griffin graduated from the local college and became a highly sought-after model for television and fashion magazines. The face of another Hood alumnus, Mary Rife, class of 1970, appeared on the cover of Mademoiselle magazine in October last year. Now another Hood student can rise through the ranks to continue the developing tradition. Christine Dannehower, who entered college last fall as a freshman, appeared in the August 1971 issue of Mademoiselle and is currently Hood’s contestant for a modeling competition sponsored by Glamor magazine, which will feature featured the 10 best-dressed college girls in the country next August. publish.

The Frederick County School Board agreed to spend $13,550 on Wednesday to expand and improve playgrounds at Catoctin High School, but a $20,000 proposal to complete an outdoor swimming pool at the school was filed. .

Goodbye sun, hello rain. Forget your hiking plans. There’s a 100% chance of rain today, National Weather Service meteorologist Howard Silverman said Friday. At least a quarter inch is possible.

WASHINGTON — In a sinister precaution, President Bush has created a “shadow government” of 75 or more officials who live and work in mountainside bunkers outside Washington in case nuclear-armed terrorists strike. the national capital. In a separate precautionary strategy, at least one member of Mr. Bush’s cabinet must be outside of Washington at all times. Congress plans to meet at a Washington-area hotel and a nearby military base if disaster strikes the Capitol.

The 21st annual service honoring the nation’s fallen firefighters will not be held on the grounds of the National Fire Academy in Emmitsburg in October. The ceremonies were moved to the MCI Center in Washington due to an increase in the number of firefighters killed in 2001. US Fire Administration figures show that 441 firefighters died in the line of duty last year, including 343 killed in the World Trade Center terrorist attack on 9/11.

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[OPINION] An open letter to my friends who called my father a criminal https://replicachristianlouboutinstore.com/opinion-an-open-letter-to-my-friends-who-called-my-father-a-criminal/ Tue, 22 Feb 2022 02:45:19 +0000 https://replicachristianlouboutinstore.com/opinion-an-open-letter-to-my-friends-who-called-my-father-a-criminal/ Dear friends who called my father a criminal, Let me take you back to this HeKaSi fourth-grade class, where I talked about Philippine presidents and their accomplishments. I was asked to stop when I started talking about martial law and its atrocities. Our history teacher, a lady known to be uncompromising and strict, jumped up […]]]>

Dear friends who called my father a criminal,

Let me take you back to this HeKaSi fourth-grade class, where I talked about Philippine presidents and their accomplishments.

I was asked to stop when I started talking about martial law and its atrocities. Our history teacher, a lady known to be uncompromising and strict, jumped up from her table, grabbed me by my right arm, pushed me aside and started talking about the length of the “Maharlika Highway and how it linked Ilocos Norte to the rest of the country.

I freeze in shock. I was sweating, but I wasn’t able to sit up because I still felt the pain from his fingernails on my arm. So I stayed in front of the class the whole time. I saw you all sitting there, your faces, your reactions, your concern (or lack thereof). The course continued and ended as if I did not exist.

Fast forward to our high school chemistry class. Our Fulbright scholarship teacher was randomly ranting about Imelda Marcos’ criticisms. He said how “stupid” they were for linking the Marcos’ “alleged” stolen wealth to his shoe collection. He said his mom also collected shoes, and they weren’t even close to being rich, and shoes weren’t that expensive to collect anyway.

We were kids then, kids who didn’t know that some shoes were handcrafted from the finest leathers in Italy and adorned with diamonds and precious stones, while those most accessible to us were made in factories in third world countries. We considered Gibi and Skechers “expensive”. And, well, since I could afford to wear them to school, then I guessed he was right: collecting shoes wasn’t that expensive at all.

Finally, do you remember that day in our senior journalism class when we were asked to write about someone we were proud of? I decided to write about my father, who is flawed in many ways but fought against dictatorship as a young university student. I was proud – I still am – because not everyone in that room had a father whose body was marked with history. Her fate was bludgeoned by the darkest days but her story is the light of our generation. But, as expected, you didn’t see it that way.

Who are the real criminals?

You called my father a criminal. I still clearly remember all your faces, the mockery, the disdain. You knew my father. He gladly brought some of you home from our school when your Sun forgot to pick you up, or when it’s raining, or whatever. He was pitching our tents during our Girl Scout camping. Some of you have even seen him in church every Sunday. Oh, he’s not a saint, but I tell you he’s not a criminal either.

I write this to remind you of all these things. And that to this day you don’t seem sure who the real criminals are. Let me help you.

The crime, according to Judge Mario Campanilla, author of the Criminal Law Reviewer, is “an act of omission punishable by law”. Not declaring and paying your taxes for any misfortune or fortune you have had is a crime.

Crime, according to Republic Law 7080, accumulates property “by any combination or series of overt or criminal acts.” This is called plunder and is punishable by life imprisonmentor life imprisonment.

The crime, according to Republic Act 1379, is when an official acquires property in an amount that exceeds his legal income. According to the law, “there is a At first glance presumption that it was illegally acquired”. It’s called stealing. And in the book of Exodus, God said, “You shall not steal.

Celebrate the Marcos

Dear friends who called my father a criminal, we have been friends since I can remember. And yet, you’re so quick to judge because my family doesn’t celebrate Marcos like you do. The funny thing is that you demand “respect” but reject the facts and the painstaking scholarship of established scholars before us. You declare them as “fake news” while you obtain your information from sources whose integrity cannot be verified.

Dear friends who called my father a criminal, I can never call you criminals since logical errors and cognitive dissonance are not crimes under Philippine laws. But they are dangerous in many ways, and the effects will be felt by the generation that comes after us. So I ask you to be aware of committing them.

Dear friends who called my father a criminal, pass by our home in Laoag and you will see my father leading a simple, imperfect but peaceful life. You’ll probably see him and my son playing legos or camping in the garden, because, yes, that’s what he’s mainly doing these days – taking care of the generation that comes after us. – Rappler.com

(The author is an experienced development worker who received her Masters in Public Administration from the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, National University of Singapore. She worked for the Philippine government from 2011 and is currently a researcher in Electoral Advocacy at the Ateneo School of Government.)

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Check Out Bella Hadid’s ’70s-Inspired Navy Tracksuit in London https://replicachristianlouboutinstore.com/check-out-bella-hadids-70s-inspired-navy-tracksuit-in-london/ Wed, 02 Feb 2022 22:46:49 +0000 https://replicachristianlouboutinstore.com/check-out-bella-hadids-70s-inspired-navy-tracksuit-in-london/ Bella Hadid brings back the tracksuit. The model was spotted in London wearing a navy ensemble that managed to recall both the 70s and the early 2000s. She teamed low-rise jogging pants with a micro zip jacket, a discontinued piece from the rapper Nas’ clothing line with “London” and “England” written across the chest in […]]]>

Bella Hadid brings back the tracksuit.

The model was spotted in London wearing a navy ensemble that managed to recall both the 70s and the early 2000s. She teamed low-rise jogging pants with a micro zip jacket, a discontinued piece from the rapper Nas’ clothing line with “London” and “England” written across the chest in bold white and red letters. Flat black rectangular shades and black leather gloves helped hold the look together, but the star accessory was definitely Burberry’s Quilted Lola shoulder bag, which features the brand’s signature plaid print pattern and logo. golden in the center.

Neil MockfordGetty Images

The model was pictured leaving his hotel as he made his way to a studio in the city. She also showcased the look on her Instagram with a carousel of selfies in which she posed from multiple angles: some with her hair down in natural waves and others in a high ponytail. She captioned the post, “+44LND.”

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Hadid has been on a roll lately when it comes to retro styles. Last week, she was spotted in New York wearing a groovy Penny Lane coat with a shearling-patterned style also reminiscent of the ’70s, while teaming the look with purple-tinted rimless rectangular sunglasses and thick rings of amber color. And she went for a night out in West Hollywood earlier the same month wearing a 90s-inspired chocolate brown dress with a plunging neckline, paired with a leopard-print shoulder bag and high-top white boots. (She was accompanied by Euphoria star Alexa Demie, whose role as Maddy Perez on the HBO show spurred her own Y2K-inspired fashion trends, thanks to her Bratz Doll aesthetic, created by costume designer Heidi Bivens.)

In 2018, Hadid opened up to BAZAAR.com of his passion for vintage shopping. “Even when I was little in high school, style was always my thing. I never wore flip flops, I always had my cute outfits, I went vintage shopping,” she said in the interview. “It’s crazy because I’ve never been one to put outfits together for people to see me, but now of course I’m walking outside and photographers are outside my apartment. So now it’s a funny thing. I watch it, instead of being like f— that, I can show what I’m really made of.”

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Dave Roberts and David Robinson passed on memories of Jackie Robinson to students at John Muir High School https://replicachristianlouboutinstore.com/dave-roberts-and-david-robinson-passed-on-memories-of-jackie-robinson-to-students-at-john-muir-high-school/ Tue, 01 Feb 2022 15:20:23 +0000 https://replicachristianlouboutinstore.com/dave-roberts-and-david-robinson-passed-on-memories-of-jackie-robinson-to-students-at-john-muir-high-school/ Manager Dave Roberts and the Los Angeles Dodgers hosted 60 John Muir High School softball and baseball players Monday at Dodger Stadium for a celebration of Jackie Robinson on his 103rd birthday. Roberts hosted the event and he was joined via video conference by David Robinson, one of Jackie and Rachel’s three children. Roberts and […]]]>

Manager Dave Roberts and the Los Angeles Dodgers hosted 60 John Muir High School softball and baseball players Monday at Dodger Stadium for a celebration of Jackie Robinson on his 103rd birthday.

Roberts hosted the event and he was joined via video conference by David Robinson, one of Jackie and Rachel’s three children. Roberts and the youngest of three children Robinson shared their take on the famous Dodgers icon.

” It’s a real treat. First of all, the Dodgers want to welcome you here. I remember being your age and having the opportunity to talk to Major League players and NFL players. So for me to be where I am right now, watching you guys and watching the man behind me, it’s going to be a special day,” Roberts began.

“I think part of my job and the thing that gives me the most joy with my job is being a storyteller. I think you know the name Jackie Robinson and its impact, but to hear it from me and his son David, it’s going to be really rewarding, exciting and it’s also going to equip you to tell the story yourself.

“That’s what creates a legacy and ultimately that’s history. For me to be the first man of color to lead the Dodgers, and also to be bi-racial and to be of Asian descent, that means a lot to me.

David shared inspiration and life lessons learned from his father, specifically emphasizing acts of service and kindness over monetary accomplishments.

“We had a trophy room in our house. Quite a substantial piece, the display case had all sorts of baseball awards, there was a gold plated shoe,” Robinson recalled. “At the back and around the room were plaques, and all of these plaques spoke of being given in recognition of service, in recognition of loyalty, in recognition of sacrifice, in recognition of contributions to development.

“I’ve had the opportunity in my life to be blessed with a good dose of wealth, a good dose of power and to have been in the presence of presidents, to have been in some of the most expensive hotels , from being around rich people. Nothing has ever lived up to the significance of the words on these plaques. I couldn’t see any dollar amounts.

“My dad never became a rich man and his goal was never to get rich. Wealth was not a problem in the 40s, 50s, 60s and 70s. Development, what you did for your next, for your race and therefore for humanity, these were the stakes. This is what I learned from my father, this generation and this time.

“I hope young people can make up their minds today, because there are a lot of distractions in this world and a lot of focus on material gains. Wealth is given a lot of credit, when in fact , the most valuable thing my father taught me was the value of service.

Celebrating Jackie Robinson Day

Every April 15, Major League Baseball celebrates Jackie Robinson Day and his retired No. 42 jersey. This year marks the 75th anniversary of Robinson breaking the color barrier.

“I think it’s a good thing,” Robinson said of his father’s recognition each season. “If you’re able to retire and be honored and carried in special ceremonies by all baseball players, you’re brought back.

“How much more glorious can it get than that? I know that more honor and respect will be given to #42 in the years to come.

Are you subscribed to the Dodger Blue YouTube channel? Be sure to ring the notification bell to watch player interviews, participate in shows and giveaways, and stay up to date with all the Dodgers news and rumors!

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Shine in the Spotlight and Out of the Spotlight – Albuquerque Public Schools https://replicachristianlouboutinstore.com/shine-in-the-spotlight-and-out-of-the-spotlight-albuquerque-public-schools/ Fri, 28 Jan 2022 14:05:18 +0000 https://replicachristianlouboutinstore.com/shine-in-the-spotlight-and-out-of-the-spotlight-albuquerque-public-schools/ Job : January 28, 2022 Shine in and out of the spotlight In his weekly message to employees, Superintendent Scott Elder highlights some of the many examples of innovative APS teaching. For a quarter century, the Albuquerque Public Schools Educational Foundation has provided grants for innovative and collaborative teaching, learning, and student support. More than […]]]>

Job : January 28, 2022

Shine in and out of the spotlight

In his weekly message to employees, Superintendent Scott Elder highlights some of the many examples of innovative APS teaching.

For a quarter century, the Albuquerque Public Schools Educational Foundation has provided grants for innovative and collaborative teaching, learning, and student support. More than $8 million has been donated to classrooms, schools and departments to help pay for everything from equipment and supplies to field trips and training. A few months ago, the Foundation awarded an additional $200,000 to 30 programs and projects that support science and technology, fine arts, literacy, social and emotional learning, and student clubs and activities. .

A perusal of the list of recipients gives you just a glimpse of the phenomenal teaching that takes place every day in our classrooms and schools across the district. This pandemic may have overfilled our plates, but it has not diminished our enthusiasm for education, our passion for the children we serve, or our determination to make a difference.

APS students learn everything from computer coding and robotics to digital theater design and jewelry making, games and 3D printing. They dance, shoot arrows (in archery lessons), explore their environment, study their cultures, work together, solve problems, develop leadership skills.

For example, at Roosevelt Middle School, teacher Robyn Clarke received support for a student-led music production that will allow students to “exhibit creativity, ingenuity, and be challenged to work collaboratively toward the end goal”.

At Wilson Middle School, Susan Schipull’s Gardening Elective classes work with the Intensive Global Support Services class to grow plants in traditional and hydroponic/aquaponic growing systems. They are also creating a community seed library, creating a cookbook, and using digital and media arts to tell the story of the garden.

A lot of teachers are taking the learning outside these days. Like Jordan Orlovsky, a teacher at eCADEMY High School, who used scholarship money to take his students on hikes, allowing them to explore the concepts they studied online as well as escape the isolation, meet friends and build relationships.

Our grant recipients represent a tiny fraction of our creative, supportive and dedicated workforce. Lately I have unfortunately spent a lot of time putting out the fires started mainly by COVID and cyber attack. But when I go out to the schools, I am impressed by what I witness and it reminds me why I am doing this job. It’s an honor, truly, to work with such caring people.

Not so long ago, staff members representing the Legislative Education Review Committee visited several of our schools to learn more about how we educate and support students. We have published stories on our website about several of these visits. Stories were overlooked among all the information we had to share with staff and families. I wanted to share them here today so you can appreciate some of the great work going on:

  • Harrison Middle School’s AVID About Learning: Program develops leadership skills that will help students in high school, later in college, and hopefully in life.
  • College-bound, career-ready Manzano culture: The high school offers innovative programs, internships, resources, and even a “human library.”
  • Westside Elementary School is a model of inclusivity: SR Marmon combines general education, Indian education, special education, dual language, English language development, enrichment and gifted programs.
  • Integrating the arts puts the “art” in the “smarts”: the goal of schools like the Janet Kahn Integrated Arts School is to help children stand up for themselves, think for themselves and to question.
  • AHA electives include Navajo language and culture: The Atrisco Heritage Academy’s unique classroom includes field trips, mock trials, art exhibits, cooking and dining, performances, and a recent fashion show.
  • Genius Hour is a Recipe for Success: Los Padillas Elementary School is one of many APS elementary schools that incorporate extra time into the school day for electives.
  • Teachers at Whittier receive daily professional training: Educators at Transformation Elementary School meet daily to share success stories and challenges and receive in-depth training and guidance.

The Foundation will begin accepting applications for its next round of grants next week. Look for more information on their website: APS Education Foundation Grants and Scholarships.

Even if you are not applying for a grant or have not published a story about your school on the website or in the local news, I know you are doing a good job. You don’t have to be in the spotlight to shine. I appreciate you and everything you do.

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Fred Mitts founder makes a name for himself with a hands-on hobby https://replicachristianlouboutinstore.com/fred-mitts-founder-makes-a-name-for-himself-with-a-hands-on-hobby/ Sat, 22 Jan 2022 01:00:00 +0000 https://replicachristianlouboutinstore.com/fred-mitts-founder-makes-a-name-for-himself-with-a-hands-on-hobby/ Nominative determinism refers to cases where a person’s surname apparently matches what they do for a living. Prime examples include a meteorologist who goes by Amy Freeze, an ornithologist named Carla Dove, and a vasectomy urologist who answers to Dr. Richard Chopp, or, ahem, Dick Chopp, for short. We only mention this because Fred Foster, […]]]>



Nominative determinism refers to cases where a person’s surname apparently matches what they do for a living. Prime examples include a meteorologist who goes by Amy Freeze, an ornithologist named Carla Dove, and a vasectomy urologist who answers to Dr. Richard Chopp, or, ahem, Dick Chopp, for short.

We only mention this because Fred Foster, the 67-year-old founder of Fred Mitts, a home-based business that produces hand-sewn mittens largely from recycled materials, has grown accustomed to people assuming mistakenly that his surname is Mitts. then openly wondering if that’s why he got into the hand covering game in the first place.

RUTH BONNEVILLE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Fred Mitts produces hand-sewn mittens largely from recycled materials.”/>

RUTH BONNEVILLE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Fred Mitts produces hand-sewn mittens largely from recycled materials.

Here’s the thing; before officially launching Fred Mitts in 2016, Foster was getting comments such as “Oh we love our Fred Mitts” or “I really need another pair of Fred Mitts” from people he made specimens for previously. When he and his wife Bev agreed he needed a nickname for his then fledgling operation, Fred Mitts, without an apostrophe-S, was the first thing that came to mind, he says, sitting next to Bev in the kitchen of their very own pinpoint Westwood abode.

“People always seem disappointed to learn that my last name is actually Foster, so much so that I don’t even bother to correct them anymore,” he continues, stroking a long gray beard that would even give thread to retaliate against Grizzly Adams. money.

“I mean, if they want me to be Fred Mitts, that’s fine with me, especially if they buy what I sell.”


Foster, who grew up in St. James, rose to prominence at Monarch Wear, a clothing manufacturer specializing in denim clothing, after leaving high school in the early 1970s. Describing himself at the time as a ” grunt,” he says his main job at the Ellice Avenue factory was to fetch supplies for the cut-and-sew managers.



<p>RUTH BONNEVILLE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS</p>
<p>There’s a story behind many of the materials used for Fred Mitts hand-sewn products.</p>
<p>“/><figcaption wp_automatic_readability=

RUTH BONNEVILLE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

There’s a story behind many of the materials used for Fred Mitts hand-sewn products.

“It was back when leather pants were all the rage (“Yeah, for about five minutes,” Bev snaps) and I guess I fell in love with the smell of leather, probably because I I had to walk hundreds of meters back and forth, day after day,” he explains.

Jump forward some 25 years; In the late 1990s, Foster, a professional plumber, had been in a new job as a foreman at a Manitoba correctional facility for about a year. He found the role very stressful and would often come home in the evenings looking for something, anything to distract himself from work. What he needed was some kind of diversion, Bev would tell him. One day, while leafing through a copy of the City of Winnipeg Leisure Guide, he realized what it could be.

The St. James Civic Center near their home offered an introductory course in mitten making. Half comfortable with a needle and thread, he signed up for the sessions—it turned out to be him and nine women, he said with a wink—and, a little more a month later, he was proudly sporting a pair of mittens that, while not too fashionable, were definitely functional.

He continued to hone his craft making mittens for his parents, his two daughters, Bev’s son, their grandchildren, neighbors… anyone who wanted a pair, pretty much. The problem was, despite the fact that he used second-hand resources for most of his wares – from the start, he and Bev regularly haunted thrift stores, looking for leather jackets and fur coats that he could not afford. he could convert into mittens – that was still a bit of an expensive hobby, given that he refused to accept even a penny for his designs.



<p>RUTH BONNEVILLE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS</p>
<p>After hearing those who loved wearing Fred’s work say things like, “Oh, we love our Fred mittens,” the Fosters knew they had a name for their home based business.</p>
<p>“/><figcaption wp_automatic_readability=

RUTH BONNEVILLE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

After hearing those who loved wearing Fred’s work say things like, “Oh, we love our Fred mitts,” the Fosters knew they had a name for their home-based business.

In 2016, nearly 20 years after that first pair of mittens, Bev noticed there was going to be a farmers market in Elie, where her son lives. She shared the news with Fred and, after convincing him that his work was definitely worth charging, he agreed to rent a table there for the princely sum of $5.

Let’s guess: his designs were an instant hit, everyone wanted a pair and the couple returned home with wads of cash in their wallets? Uh, not so much.

“The market was in July and it’s not like too many people were buying winter clothes,” Bev says with a laugh. “We didn’t sell a single pair and spent most of our time pointing people looking for corn, beets, carrots, etc., in the right direction.”

Unfazed, the couple signed up for a second market, still at Elie, a little closer to the holiday season. What a difference a few months and a drop in temperature make. Fred Mitts was an unqualified hit in December, and by the time the following Christmas rolled around, Foster had become a familiar face at pop-up sales in and around town.



<p>RUTH BONNEVILLE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS</p>
<p>After working at Monarch Wear in Winnipeg in the 1970s, Foster was semi-comfortable with a needle and thread, so in the late 90s he signed up for a mitten-making workshop as a pass. – anti-stress time.</p>
<p>“/><figcaption wp_automatic_readability=

RUTH BONNEVILLE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

After working at Monarch Wear in Winnipeg in the 1970s, Foster was half-hearted with a needle and thread, so in the late 1990s he signed up for a mitten-making course as a pass. – anti-stress time.


“Here, let me give you a quick tour,” he says, leading a visitor downstairs, where most of his stock is. Donning a fur hat — yes, he does, too — he holds out a pair of mittens made from a vintage raccoon coat, the fur of which he brushed to make it look brand new.

“There’s a funny story behind these,” he continues, picking up a different pair, black in color. “Someone I know had a bearskin rug in their basement, except their dog wouldn’t leave it alone – he was constantly barking at it – so they gave it to me, to see if I could. do something about it.”

Next, he shows off a pair of white leather mittens with matching tassels, revealing that the material we’re looking at is from a set of repurposed couch cushions. Plus, there are currently five oversized plastic bags in his workspace garage, each filled to the brim with leather scraps, gifts from a furniture factory manager who didn’t have the heart to toss the discarded coins, and reached out to ask if he was interested in getting them off his hands, free of charge. Was the comrade joking? He would be here in 20 minutes, was the reply.



<p>RUTH BONNEVILLE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS</p>
<p>The Manitoba Museum recently purchased half a dozen pairs of mittens for sale in the gift shop, and Fred’s also shipped a few to Australia at the request of a nephew.”/><figcaption wp_automatic_readability=

RUTH BONNEVILLE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

The Manitoba Museum recently purchased half a dozen pairs of mittens for sale in the gift shop, and Fred’s also shipped a few to Australia at the request of a nephew.

The last sale the Fosters attended was in February 2020, weeks before COVID-19 turned the world upside down. Citing their age, Fred says he and Bev have chosen to lay low until things get back to “semi-normal”, not that he’s parked his needle for the past 22 months – far from it. (Bev laughs, noting that she offered to help him out last summer by turning on his sewing machine and helping him with the linings, only to be told that would be cheating and that they honestly couldn’t label their mittens as hand-sewn if they started cutting corners.)

“I basically used that downtime to stock up,” he says, noting that a representative from the Manitoba Museum recently purchased half a dozen pairs of mittens to sell in the gift shop, and that he also shipped a few to Australia at the request of a nephew who told him they would come in handy, no pun intended, when he and his buddies go fishing in the mountains.

In addition, those interested can contact the couple via their Facebook page.

“It’s a bit tricky because every pair is one-of-a-kind, and you practically have to try them on to see if they’re right for you or not,” she says. “But yeah, curbside pickup is something we’ve been trying to make work, given the current situation with COVID.”

One more thing ; if you run into the Fosters at a sale somewhere down the road, don’t be insulted if you compliment Fred on his expert work, and he silently nods in response.

“I’m deaf as a stone and I don’t always wear my hearing aids because of the ambient noise,” he says. “So I tend to let Bev do the most talking, while I sit there.”

“You mean, sit there looking good,” Bev said with a smile.

“Yeah,” he smiled back. “That’s what I was trying to say.”

david.sanderson@freepress.mb.ca

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Euphoria Season 2 Outfits: Shop Your Favorite Character’s Looks https://replicachristianlouboutinstore.com/euphoria-season-2-outfits-shop-your-favorite-characters-looks/ Tue, 18 Jan 2022 19:50:47 +0000 https://replicachristianlouboutinstore.com/euphoria-season-2-outfits-shop-your-favorite-characters-looks/ Simply put, Sam Levinson Euphoria is must-see television every Sunday night. Not only is each episode of the high school drama packed with suspense and conflict to keep you busy for an hour, but it features an array of character archetypes that every viewer can relate to in some way. One of the ways viewers […]]]>

Simply put, Sam Levinson Euphoria is must-see television every Sunday night. Not only is each episode of the high school drama packed with suspense and conflict to keep you busy for an hour, but it features an array of character archetypes that every viewer can relate to in some way. One of the ways viewers were able to connect with each character is through their wardrobes which were curated by costume designer Heidi Bivens.

Dotted with popular streetwear brands and vintage designer pieces, Bivens has crafted a wardrobe that people in real life might want to seek out and wear, eschewing the usual formula of generic outfits so often seen in other TV shows. .

“I remember wanting to avoid anything resembling what I call, ‘ABC Family teen.’ I was given the freedom and the support to really push it. I was asked to push it,” Bivens told Complex in 2019. that looks generic or commercial.

While some pieces like the vintage Jean Paul Gaultier vest from Rue, the psychedelic Jules hockey t-shirt from Perks and Mini, or the Chanel bag Maddy poses with while babysitting might not be the easiest things to find right now, there are still a lot of clothes from the Euphoria easy-to-get-at-the-hand wardrobe. For anyone looking for that sweater Fezco wears on New Years Eve or the Telfar hoodie newcomer Elliot wears to class, we’ve already done the searching for you.

Find out where to buy some of the items worn by the actors of Euphoria throughout Season 2, below. Be sure to check back weekly to see if any of the plays that caught your eye in the last episode made the list.

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For BYU’s Shaylee Gonzales – a star on the court and an entrepreneur off it – it was ‘time’ for the NCAA to change its rules https://replicachristianlouboutinstore.com/for-byus-shaylee-gonzales-a-star-on-the-court-and-an-entrepreneur-off-it-it-was-time-for-the-ncaa-to-change-its-rules/ Sun, 16 Jan 2022 15:39:50 +0000 https://replicachristianlouboutinstore.com/for-byus-shaylee-gonzales-a-star-on-the-court-and-an-entrepreneur-off-it-it-was-time-for-the-ncaa-to-change-its-rules/ Shaylee Gonzales had her first camera long before she became a star guard for BYU’s women’s basketball team. She was in college then, taking pictures and making videos of her friends. From then on, his camera became an extension of his hands. But it was at Mesquite High School in his native Arizona that Gonzales […]]]>

Shaylee Gonzales had her first camera long before she became a star guard for BYU’s women’s basketball team. She was in college then, taking pictures and making videos of her friends. From then on, his camera became an extension of his hands.

But it was at Mesquite High School in his native Arizona that Gonzales turned his hobby into a real career opportunity. She took a photography course and started a photography business which she called Sincerely Shaylee.

“My photos weren’t very good,” Gonzales told the Salt Lake Tribune. “It was in high school, so it was nothing too serious, too professional. But it was just a little way to make money.

From an early age, Gonzales had a gift for creativity. She created her own paintings and decorations for her childhood bedroom painted in black, white and purple. She also started her Youtube channel during her freshman year in high school in 2015, which first featured her vacationing with her family or on school outings – all filmed and edited herself.

Gonzales turned his love of creating in this way into a large following on social media, which also allowed him to benefit financially from the relaxation of NCAA name, image and likeness rules.

“It’s almost like my own little one — like I’m my own boss, like I have my own job, basically,” Gonzales said. “Social media is basically a job. I make money doing business with brands. And I could definitely do that in the future as well – continue and grow my brand even more.

Candice Gonzales, Shaylee’s mother, said her daughter likely gets her business acumen from her father, Josh. Gonzales’ parents are in real estate, they rent office buildings and other properties, they own a home care business that employs over 650 people, and they own an AAU basketball team called Team Arizona.

“I think Shaylee’s advantage is that her dad is really an entrepreneur,” Candice Gonzales said. “He’s always trying to find ways to improve things and start things off. So I think he was sort of the driving force behind it all.

The BYU Second Guard has around 425,000 followers on their various social media accounts, including Instagram, TikTok, YouTube and Twitter. What started as videos she made for fun morphed into ones that show the life of a Division I athlete – from game days to road trips to recovering from a ACL injury. She also posts videos of her and her four siblings performing synchronized basketball routines, and some of them feature her Cougars teammates.

Her following began to grow tremendously during her freshman year at BYU, when she continued making game-day videos with her teammates — a practice she began during her senior year in high school. But for much of his time at BYU, Gonzales hasn’t been able to monetize his followers or his brand much.

This has changed with the new NIL rules.

“When NIL came through, I was like, ‘It’s about time,'” Gonzales said.

Gonzales has signed a few NIL agreements since the new law was passed. Major ones include a deal with Mountain America Credit Union — she’ll be featured on podcasts, commercials and billboards while promoting them on social media — and Thrifthood, a vintage clothing company in Provo that dresses her outfits in pregame. She also has several smaller deals, many with cosmetics or clothing companies.

The partnership with Thrifthood allows Gonzales to show his passion for fashion. She’s a self-proclaimed clothing lover with an eclectic taste – from baggy sweatshirts to a beautiful dress and heels.

“I love the clothes,” Gonzales said. “I do a little too much online shopping.”

The opportunity for Gonzales in the NIL space also gave him the idea of ​​having his own merchandise and logo. She sells hats, shirts, phone cases and other items on his website to his fans, who go by the name Shaybaes.

But being so much in the public eye has its downsides, Gonzales said. Lately, she’s stopped posting on social media because she feels “burnt out” and hopes her fans will understand why she’s taking time off. And although she is now able to complete her scholarship with her supporters, it has never been a matter of attention for her.

“I don’t do it to gain followers and to be famous or anything,” Gonzales said. “I do it because I like it and I think it’s fun. I do it because I like to inspire others.

The potential to inspire her fans was why she was so open about her recovery from ACL and meniscus surgery. She shared clips of herself in the hospital bed right after the surgery. She explained how recovery affected her mental health.

“I think it’s important to show the ups and downs so people can see that life isn’t all rainbows and butterflies,” Gonzales said.

Gonzales may have over 400,000 followers, but she said she’s lucky few people are posting negative comments, which can be abundant for women in the public eye. However, she is still careful not to post too much about her personal life as she finds herself in what she considers a “unique” position.

“I want to be a woman and go to BYU, to be LDS, it’s a very, very unique situation, I want to have this sequel,” Gonzales said. “And I find that sometimes super stressful and overwhelming with all these eyes on me — like posting and knowing that a lot of other people know a lot about me.”

Candice Gonzales described her daughter as a kind person who puts others before herself, and also someone who cares about what people think of her. She thinks her daughter has been able to compartmentalize in ways that she understands which opinions matter and which don’t.

“I think she may have been able to distinguish between actual human contact and computer contact,” Candice Gonzales said. “She’s more worried about what someone will say to her in person and what she thinks rather than the person, maybe, on the internet who isn’t real.”

From an early age, Gonzales seemed destined to play basketball. Both of her parents played at Grand Canyon University and they currently own the AAU team she played on. His two younger brothers and two younger sisters also play basketball.

“It’s kind of in our blood,” Gonzales said.

Candice Gonzales said Shaylee fell in love with basketball when she was around 8 years old after playing in a weekend tournament with seventh and eighth grade girls. At 10, her mother saw that she had the potential to play at a high level.

Candice Gonzales recalled a sequence during her daughter’s sophomore year of high school when, as time ran out, she got down on her knees to retrieve the ball and, from that position, shot him just inside the half court and did it.

Rick Egan | The Salt Lake Tribune) BYU basketball player Shaylee Gonzales at the Marriott Center in Provo on Tuesday, Jan. 11, 2022.

This season, Gonzales is averaging a career-high 18.5 points, as well as averaging 5.3 rebounds and 3.8 assists. She has scored at least 20 points in eight games this season.

Gonzales has two more years of BYU eligibility, and she plans to play both. She acknowledged, however, that those plans could always change. Her dream is to play professional basketball and she plans to go abroad to nurture her love of travel and stimulate her creative side.

“Living in a different country, I think, would be amazing,” Gonzales said. “And I feel like it could also bring out my creative side with photography and social media. I feel like it would be a great opportunity to grow my brand even more if I played as a pro. .

To this day, Gonzales is surprised to have gained popularity on the internet. When asked what she thought of her on a billboard, she had no words to describe it.

But what seems to be at the forefront of his mind is opportunity. When she started her journey on social media and seemed to always be taking pictures, always posting, she looks back on that time as “Business Shaylee mode” kicks in. She said she would probably start a another photography business one day.

She also looks to “little Shaylee,” who has worked as hard as 21-year-old Shaylee now works to continue building her brand — a brand she believes has a future beyond BYU.

“I knew if I built a brand here in college, being a Division I athlete, that once I was done I could have my own business, potentially,” Gonzales said.

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